Herbal Roots

Herbal Roots

Astragalus contains several beneficial compounds that have health-protecting benefits. These include saponins, sterols, isoflavones and polysaccharides, and they may help to minimize free radical damage to membranes. Astragalus promotes the production of stem cells in bone marrow and lymph tissue and encourages their development into active immune cells. It also enhances the body’s production of immunoglobulin and stimulates macrophages. Astragalus can help activate T cells and natural killer cells. It appears to help trigger immune cells from a “resting” state into heightened activity. Astragalus has also been used as a tonic to build stamina. Ancient Chinese texts record the use of astragalus for tonifying the spleen, blood and chi.

Bayberry root bark has astringent properties. It has been used traditionally for a variety of systems and organs, including the female reproductive system, the liver, the immune system, oral health and more.

Black cohosh has been valued by many societies for its nutritional support of the female reproductive system. Low estrogen levels have been linked to common female reproductive problems. Black cohosh possesses mild estrogenic properties (phytoestrogens) and helps balance female hormone levels by binding to estrogen receptor sites. Balanced hormone levels help ease common menopausal symptoms. Black cohosh also has antispasmodic properties and helps relax muscle spasms, including those associated with premenstrual and menstrual cycles and stages.

Also called papoose root or squaw root, blue cohosh is known to women as a mild alternative to black cohosh. It is traditionally used for female glandular support.

Burdock is a common weed with giant leaves and seeds (burrs) that cling tenaciously to clothing. It has been used traditionally as a blood purifier. Burdock’s antioxidant activity may help protect the liver from toxicity. This herb also supports immune system function.

Butchers used to sweep off their cutting blocks with this herb. That’s why it is now called butcher’s broom. It is rich in flavonoids that help strengthen blood vessels.

Dandelion root has nutritive properties that support the liver, kidneys, stomach and blood. It provides nutrition for the glands responsible for maintaining already balanced blood sugar levels. Herbalists consider this plant one of the most nutrient-rich in the plant kingdom. The whole plant is edible—the flowers, the leaves and the roots. The herb is a source of many important minerals and vitamins.

Herbalists consider devil’s claw a nutritional aid for the structural and immune systems.

Pronounced “don kwy,” it is considered the queen of herbs by the Chinese and is China’s most popular herb for women. Chinese physicians use dong quai to enrich the blood, promote circulation, regulate menstruation, calm nerves and soothe the intestines.

Goldenseal’s immune-supporting properties are largely due to its hydrastine, berberine and canadine alkaloids. It is said to help support the mucous membranes that line the respiratory, digestive and urinary tracts.

Originally used by the Cherokee Indians for kidney support, hydrangea was introduced to early American settlers for similar purposes. Hydrangea is a bitter and a solvent herb. It nutritionally supports the urinary system and addresses mild edema associated with the menstrual cycle. It contains natural minerals plus silicon, flavonoids, resins and saponins.

Our concentrated extract of kava kava root helps reduce normal anxiety without impairing mental function. It promotes muscle relaxation and restful sleep without dulling the senses.

Licorice Root has a reputation for helping the entire body maintain balance. It supports the glandular system, specifically the adrenal glands. It may also help the liver.

Maca (Lepidium meyenii) , a member of the radish family, addresses the needs of the glandular system. It grows in the Andes Mountains of South America and may provide a natural means for improving sexual desire and performance. It may also support physical and mental strength in both males and females. Also known as Peruvian ginseng, maca may help enhance physical energy and endurance, promote mental clarity and concentration and boost work capacity. As an adaptogen, it helps restore stamina and buffer the effects of stress.

Marshmallow has a high mucilage content; in fact it is 25–30% polysaccharides (mucilage) and 25–30% starch, which account for its demulcent effects on the digestive tract. It has been used historically for respiratory support and to soothe mucous membranes.

Also known as Missouri Snake Root, parthenium is a perennial herb indigenous to North and South America and the West Indies. In years past, parthenium was often mislabeled as echinacea by herbal suppliers, but the plant’s properties are different from those of echinacea. Parthenium has been used traditionally to support the immune system.

Sarsaparilla is traditionally used to support the circulatory system and the liver. It also has tonic properties and has been used traditionally for skin support. It may also promote normal digestion and appetite.

Valerian has been used for occasional sleeplessness for over 1,000 years. Its ability to help relax the central nervous system, promote feelings of calm, decrease levels of anxiety and stress, and enhance sleep are known to millions the world over.

Wild Yam root supports and balances the female glandular system.

Yellow dock’s active principles include anthraquinones, which are responsible for its mild colon-stimulating activity, and tannins, which provide an astringent effect. A member of the buckwheat family, yellow dock grows abundantly throughout the U.S. Pioneers used it for nutritional support of the urinary system.

Yucca grows abundantly in the southwestern U.S. and Mexico. The plant is also called soap root, with the reference to soap coming from a long historical use of the plant’s roots as a foaming cleanser. Yucca contains large amounts of steroidal saponins, which account for its lathering ability. Saponins also support structural health due to their influence on joint health and function.

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